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For Guys

Funny Foursome: Cracking comedians coming to SG in March 2015

Making folks laugh is a tricky business. We asked four comedians – slated to perform in Magners International Comedy Festival this March – about their favourite one-liners, performance rituals and more.

 

 

Ria Lina

If you weren’t a comedian, what would you be doing?
Hmm, asylum? Homeless? I came to comedy after not being able to handle other things (or other things not handling me). I think that’s what makes comedians so fascinating to listen to; they don’t quite fit the mould around them and have a unique perspective as a result.

How does the audience in Singapore differ from the rest of the world?
I really like Singapore because it has so much diversity in such a small geographic area. I’m from a mixed-race background and I’ve lived all over the world growing up, so it kind of feels like I’m coming home in a way because the audience is full of people that get what I’m saying, as they’ve lived it too. I also look more like people in Singapore then I do in say, Norway. That’s a new thing for me as I’ve lived in Europe my whole career.

What makes you laugh?
I have a very silly sense of humour, especially when my husband is the butt of the joke, so I will laugh hysterically at anything done to him in his sleep, like making his belly button talk. I know it’s wrong, but he hasn’t left me yet…

What can we expect from you in the coming months?
I’m working on a new show, Taboo Raider, for Edinburgh 2015, and I’m bringing a mix of old and new standup in March in a specially designed compilation for Asia called Oriental Expressed. Really looking forward to it.

Any one-liners to leave us with?
Here’s one of mine that made the Top 10 jokes of the Edinburgh Fringe last year: “I wanted to do a joke on feminism, but my husband wouldn’t let me.”

 

 

Wes Zaharuk

When did you realise you had the ability to make people laugh?
In primary school the class clown was sick one day and I filled in. Any thoughts of being a doctor or finishing my education went out the window after that day.

If you weren’t a comedian, what would you be doing?
I would probably be coming up with the cure for cancer or something like that but fortunately I became a comic where I feel I can do something really worthwhile, where I can make a difference.

What’s in store for us at this year’s Comedy Festival?
Comedy with household objects, used in a way you never dreamed possible.

Do you have a pre-performance ritual?
A human sacrifice and a few limbering-up exercises.

Have you had any embarrassing moments on stage?
Being held down and getting the bottom of my feet tickled because, like a fool, I carelessly let it slip in a newspaper article that I had an affinity for feet-tickling.

What can we expect from you in the coming months?
The unexpected (unless you know me, and then it will pretty much be the same: being banned from yet another bar on some trumped up charge of foot-tickling).

Any one-liners to leave us with?
I was driving and I hit a magician. He came out of nowhere.

 

 

Nik Coppin

When did you realise you had the ability to make people laugh?
Well, I was never the “class clown” at school, so I didn’t realise I had the potential to be a comedian until at least my late teens or early 20s. Ironically, it wasn’t comedians and entertainers that made me want to be a comedian, but rather my all-time favourite superhero, Spider-Man. At an early age, I loved the fact that he would be fighting supervillains and cracking jokes at the same time. No matter how battered he was getting, he would always find a witticism to come back with. I always found that kind of cool.

If you weren’t a comedian, what would you be doing?
For years I worked on London Underground Ltd as a signalman and ticket office clerk. They were jobs that I didn’t want to stay in and I wasn’t particularly great at. It was just a stopgap that went on for far too long.

I guess I would have been a cartoonist of some description as I used to read comic books and draw superheroes and cartoons. I also decided on many other different things before becoming a stand-up comedian. Footballer, boxer and dolphin trainer were among the other things I thought about doing in my mid to late teens.

What’s in store for us at this year’s Comedy Festival?
Cheeky fun at the Shaggers show, where a variety of comedians will be telling jokes and anecdotes about relationships and sex.

The show will feature more Singaporean comedians, since I discovered more of them while doing my Southeast Asian tour in November.

What can we expect from you in the coming months?
My only solo shows this year are the ones in March, in Hong Kong, Manila and Singapore. I’m not doing a solo show at the Australian comedy festivals and probably not at the Edinburgh Fringe. Since I’m compering most of them with a few spots here and there, you can expect more new material to be worked on stage.

 

 

Imaan Hadchiti

When did you realise you had the ability to make people laugh?
I have been doing comedy since I was 15, so pretty much all my life I’ve had the ability to make people laugh.

If you weren’t a comedian, what would you be doing?
Living comfortably in a house with a wife and kids.

How does the audience in Singapore differ from the rest of the world?
Singapore has a great cross-section of people, which means you can talk to every corner of the globe in one gig.

Have you had any embarrassing moments on stage?
If you’re talking about the time I went on stage without any pants on … then no.

Any one-liners to leave us with?
It’s not my one line but it’s the funniest joke an audience member has told me: “What’s the difference between lentils and chickpeas? I wouldn’t pay $1,000 to have lentils on my chest.

 

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